How many Bladestars....

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altwolf
altwolf's picture
How many Bladestars....

would it take to lift a lightbulb? What about a paper black book?

I would love to see someone rig up some sort of multibladestar lifting frame...

Peter Redmer
Peter Redmer's picture

This is really a great idea - I hope that someone out there gives this a shot... it's interesting to think of how much lifting power they actually have, and to measure it.

Anybody wanna try it? 

RobosapienV2-4mem8
RobosapienV2-4mem8's picture

I need to get some blade stars first peter, Have not seem them in NZ yet.

Rudolph
Rudolph's picture

Doesn't the entire assembly of the BladeStar spin during flight? I believe one would have to attach some kind of swivel assembly to the bladestar in order to attach a lifting frame, otherwise the frame would spin too, especially if using more than one bladestar. A light load (eg lightbulb) could probably use a fishing-line swivels on each lifting bladestar. For heaver objects (eg book) it may take some kind of bearing assembly (needle bearings vs ball bearings?) attaching a solid frame to several bladestars. I imagine that in order to overcome the (albeit low) friction of the bearings one would have to run extra bladestars before even being able to add the intended load.

What this question really makes me want to know... Could a pair of bladestars carry a coconut on a line between them?

GWJax
GWJax's picture

Pete if you wan't to send me more BladeStars I'll do it. But at 50 bucks a piece ouch,  It would be quit simple to attach multi BladeStars togeather. I'll measure how much lifting one has and let you know how many you'll need.

RobosapienV2-4mem8
RobosapienV2-4mem8's picture

Where the !!!!!!!!!! do you get your time from GW, You have so many projects on that I get dizzy just thinking about them. Ha Ha.

GWJax
GWJax's picture

its called structured time. never stay on one project too long else your mind will get stuck in one problem. By changing to a new problem to solve, this will unlock your first problem you had. Thats what I do all day long is troubleshooting and i'm always thinking of 7 diffrent things at once.

milw
milw's picture

Unfortunately, one Bladestar is barely capable of lifting a dime (taped on the bottom). The tape is probably kind of un-aerodynamic, but I don't think these things have much excess lift. Looking forward to your lift measurements, GW!

GWJax
GWJax's picture

Ya me too.  The weight of my first circuit was about and I say was about .. Well let me go weigh it... 2grams the same weight as the dime, This only lifted up about 6 to 12 inches off the ground and no more. I'll find the exact weight to where it can handle a true flight.

NoroBiik
NoroBiik's picture

Maybe a paperclip :)  For the Bladestar to be able to "move" substantial weights you'd probably need neutral buoyancy, a party balloon should do the trick.

GWJax
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Adding a balloon would give some lift but this is not what the challenge is. How many BS do you need to lift a book or a lightbulb? not how many balloons you can add. nice answer anyways.

MrScott
MrScott's picture

I think we're more likely to find enough monkeys and typewriters to write Hamlet, than we are to get BladeStars to lift a book.

GWJax
GWJax's picture

I have the answer to the problem. It would only take 1 BladeStar to lift a light bulb or a book. This is only lifting and not flying around with it. With the correct pully system you could lift these items with only one BladeStar. By transfering the little bit of force that the bladestar makes a pully system could lift these items, but now it's time to design a pully system to prove the theory. I do have pulleys but I don't think Ihave enough to do the job so I'll have to do the math.

MrScott
MrScott's picture

Only if you have some of those handy frictionless pulleys and weightless rope that we used in physics class.

GWJax
GWJax's picture

hehe.....It's still possible!!!!

edit or maybe a long carbonfiber rod on a fulcrum! I think I mis-spelled that. Oh well I do that alot. lol

RobosapienV2-4mem8
RobosapienV2-4mem8's picture

I'm not getting involved with this discussion no time, but certainly will read what's happening though, Good luck.
Oh BTW GW nice avatar.

MrScott
MrScott's picture

All I'm saying is that if the excess lift capacity of a BladeStar is 1 gram, then the weight of the swivel, and lift line, have to be subtracted from that 1gram to find out how much force it can really apply.

On the positive side, you can use the lightest thread you can find, because you don't have to worry about it breaking from the weight it will be carrying.

BTW, did you notice there's a spell checker in the post editor now? Yay!

GWJax
GWJax's picture

no I did not. Great that will help me because I suck in spelling, lol

Billboard
Billboard's picture

For a harness. I was thinking getting one of those little metal balls that are in those magnet building sets and glueing it to the middle of the bottom on the bladestar. And getting a round neodenium (spelled right?) and attaching it to whatever you want to lift. Put the two magnets together and you get them to stick and it allowed them to turn like a ball bearing. So you bladestar doesnt loose speed.

GWJax
GWJax's picture

those metal ball are too heavy go with the rare earth magnets that radio shack sells.

MrScott
MrScott's picture

Just remember that the weight of those magnets comes out of your payload capacity.

Thread and a small bearing equipped swivel will likely weigh less.